Artigo publicado: Outgroup homogeneity effect in perception

Título: Outgroup homogeneity effect in perception: An exploration with Ebbinghaus illusion

Autores: Keiko Ishii and Shinobu Kitayama

Periódico: Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 13, 4

Abstract: clique aqui

An outgroup homogeneity (OH) effect implies that outgroup members are perceived to be more similar than ingroup members. At present, however, it is not clear whether the OH effect is truly perceptual. Here, we used an Ebbinghaus illusion to demonstrate the OH effect in perception. Participants were presented with one central face that was surrounded by four surrounding faces. The central face was judged to be smaller as the size of the surrounding faces increased, thereby demonstrating an Ebbinghaus illusion. As predicted, however, this illusion was significantly greater when the faces allegedly belonged to an outgroup than when they allegedly belonged to an ingroup. This perceptual OH effect bore no significant relationship with cognitive OH measures. The perceptual versus cognitive OH effects might therefore be mediated by separate mechanisms.

Artigo publicado: Understanding Immigrants’ Experiences: Reflections on Ken Dion’s Research Contributions

Título: Understanding Immigrants’ Experiences: Reflections on Ken Dion’s Research Contributions

Autora: Karen Kisiel Dion

Periódico: Journal of Social Issues, 66, 4, 648-652

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This article focuses on Ken Dion’s contributions to a central issue for understanding the psychology of immigration: namely, intergroup relations and immigrants’ experiences. Immigrants face many challenges, including the experience of prejudice and discrimination directed toward them by others already residing in the society to which they have immigrated. Ken’s research focused on the perspective of those who are the targets of discrimination. After briefly describing his early seminal work on the social psychology of reported discrimination, his later contributions to this area are discussed, in particular, his involvement in interdisciplinary collaborative research pertaining to immigration which provided unique opportunities to further develop and test his ideas.

Artigo publicado: Psychological Perspectives on Immigration

Título: Psychological Perspectives on Immigration

Autores: Victoria M. Esses, Kay Deaux, Richard N. Lalonde and Rupert Brown

Periódico: Journal of Social Issues, 66, 4, 635-647

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We introduce this issue by describing recent trends in migration and immigration policy, and the challenges faced by immigrants and by immigrant-receiving nations around the world. We then discuss the many contributions that psychology can make to understanding and optimizing the benefits of migration from the perspective of both immigrants and members of host societies. The article concludes by providing an overview of the rationale, organization, and content of the issue, including a brief description of each article.

Artigo publicado: Decreasing Gender Prejudice Among Children

Título: Teaching Children Fairness: Decreasing Gender Prejudice Among Children

Autores: Britney G. Brinkman, Allison Jedinak, Lee A. Rosen and Toni S. Zimmerman

Periódico: Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy, 9, 1

Abstract: clique aqui
Elementary school children (66 girls and 55 boys, aged 10–13 years) in the Western United States participated in a program designed to teach them about fairness and to decrease their engagement in gender-prejudice behaviors. The study utilized a pretest/posttest design comparing students in the treatment group to students in a control group. Children and teachers completed measures regarding the children’s engagement of gender prejudice among their classmates, and students participated in focus groups after completing the program. At posttest, students in the treatment group reported experiencing less gender-prejudice by their classmates than students in the control group. Teachers also reported fewer gender-prejudice behaviors by the students in the treatment group. Qualitative analyses of the focus groups revealed that the students reported learning to challenge gender role stereotypes and endorsed a commitment to treating boys and girls fairly.

Artigo publicado: How Ideological Attitudes Predict Host Society Members’ Attitudes toward Immigrants

Título: How Ideological Attitudes Predict Host Society Members’ Attitudes toward Immigrants: Exploring Cross-National Differences

Autores: KarJ. Christopher Cohrs and Monika Stelzl

Periódico: Journal of Social Issues, 66, 4, 673-694

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Recent theoretical frameworks assume that the ideological attitudes of right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) and social dominance orientation (SDO) predict individuals’ attitudes toward immigrant groups, and that these predictive relations are affected by contextual factors. Based on these assumptions, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relations between ideological attitudes and anti-immigrant attitudes in 155 samples from 17 countries (totalN= 38,522 participants). As potential correlates of cross-national differences in these relations, socioeconomic indices, cultural worldviews, and collective perceptions of immigrants were considered. RWA was a particularly strong predictor of anti-immigrant attitudes in countries where immigrants were perceived as increasing the crime rate and as not being beneficial to the economy (e.g., Germany, Italy); and SDO was a particularly strong predictor in countries with a higher relative unemployment rate of immigrants (e.g., Belgium, Sweden). We discuss the interplay of individual and sociocultural factors and offer directions for future research.